T: 01482 814895 info@pgsaccountancy.co.uk

PGS Accountancy Services

Solving the puzzles of business growth, tax planning and accounting.

Hull Tax Saving Specialist

Our fixed fee services cover a wide range of accounting options which will help you with your company planning.

Accounting Principal, Paul Stark qualified as a chartered accountant with Price Waterhouse in 1993

He has been helping local people save tax and improve their  businesses ever since!

His extensive  experience with accountancy firms, in the public sector and in industry mean he has  gained  a wide range of experience with differing types and sizes of business.

He was awarded a fellowship of the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales in 2004

“Thank you for providing a high quality financial service to our Charity. Reliable and Efficient service always received. Thank you for making Accountancy understandable! Always willing to undertake the honorary treasurers role with enthusiasm!”

Debbie Andrew Manager of “Relate Hull & East Yorkshire”

“Paul of PGS Accountancy has been looking after my books for many years. He is easy to get hold of when I have a question and his answers are very informative plus more importantly he talks to me in a language that I understand. If you think all accountants are the same, you haven’t had a chat with Paul.”

Valerie Prentice: Cultural Bodyworks, Beverley

We work closely with our clients and act for a broad range of business and personal clients.

Apart from the more general types of accountancy and taxation services we can also assist you with business development and specialist tax services.

Our philosophy is always to do our utmost to.

  • Provide friendly, courteous and efficient service;
  • Always exceed your expectations;
  • Listen to what YOU are saying;
  • Communicate with you quickly and fully;
  • Never surprise you with bills you are not expecting;
  • Be honest, truthful and upfront with you at all times;
  • Aim for you to pay the least amount of tax payable within the law;
  • Provide pro-active business advice wherever possible.

Business Accounts

  • Preparation of annual accounts
  • Preparation of partnership accounts
  • Reports on analytical review of accounts
  • In addition detailed summaries can be produced giving the proprietor added value information of graphs/charts and five year summaries

Limited Company Accounts

  • Preparation of annual accounts
  • Preparation of abbreviated accounts for filing with Companies House
  • Filing of abbreviated accounts with Companies House on your behalf
  • As with sole trade/partnership accounts, added value information can be provided

Income Tax

  • Business profits – tax computations and calculations – ensuring you pay the right amount of tax for the business claiming all relevant up to date allowances
  • Personal self assessment tax returns
  • Partnership tax returns
  • Capital allowance computations

Happy New Year

No I haven’t gone mad. Well probably not. The 24th March used to be the last day of the legal year, with the new one starting on Lady Day (25th March). In 1751 however this was changed so that the legal year ended on 31st December. However the financial institutions stayed with the old system even keeping the 11 days dropped when the calendar changed to the Gregorian system. This is what wikipedia has to say: “Several theories have been proposed for the odd beginning of the British tax year on 6 April. One is that from 1753 until 1799, the tax year began on 5 April, which corresponded to 25 March Old Style. After the twelfth skipped Julian leap day in 1800, it was changed to 6 April, which still corresponded to 25 March Old Style. However it was not changed when a thirteenth Julian leap day was skipped in 1900, so the tax year in the UK still begins on 6 April.” Wasn’t that interesting? HMRC have never been good at keeping up with the times, they still resist e-mail (although in theory that ought to increase their efficiency many-fold, it doesn’t appear to in practice). And the point of all this? well none really but I do want to remind you that if you haven’t maxed out your ISA’s for the year or done anything else that needs doing before 5th April, time is running out! Have a great week Paul Oh and yes I know Mr Darcy (Pride and Prejudice) is firmly in the early 19th century so over 60 years... read more

Spring is springing out all over

Henry the Taxman wants your money. Yes, for those of you who thought last week’s post about flat rate VAT was boring, we had the budget this week.  And you will no doubt seen a lot of commentary about his tax grabs on self employed and small businesses so I won’t add to that except to say that the Office of Budget Responsibility has calculated that the tax saving on incorporation is £3,300 when it’s more like £1,300 . Quite apart from the fact that Hammond is basing taxation policy on dodgy numbers, it shows that even so called “experts” can’t always get it right. I am forever seeing articles where only some of the variables have been considered and it does bug me. But then I am a numbers nerd. In essence the present tax system seems to be based on taking a chunk of what’s there instead of encouraging people to earn and produce more wealth (leading to higher tax receipts along with less need for public spending). However you don’t need to make the same mistake. I have said it before; you can only take making savings (tax or otherwise) so far but the amount you can earn is (in theory) unlimited. Start by increasing your prices by 10%. If you do it right almost no one will notice and those who do probably won’t care. Indeed if you aren’t getting “price resistance” then you probably aren’t charging enough. Yes there are always price buyers but do you want them? A small business can’t usually afford to pile it high and sell it cheap, so offer value to the... read more

Oh woe is me

I have had a cold this week, my head feels like mush and it’s hard to think, so not much work has been done apart from setting up my new computer (which was a mistake, keyboard stopped working on my current computer as if in protest). Fortunately after ringing Steve (my tame computer guru) I found a USB keyboard instead  of faffing around with the old one. A simple solution as they often are (afterwards). Talking of simple, does anyone use the flat rate VAT scheme? It was designed to make life simpler for VAT registered businesses by allowing them to take a percentage of their turnover (depending on their business type) and pay that rather than calculating the VAT on every transaction as you would normally do. So far so good but one little trick which had been popular, was for businesses who had little purchased VAT to use this to actually make a profit (I won’t go into details here). Sadly HMRC have decided to put a stop to this from 1 April this year. If you don’t spend enough on goods for resale or that get used up in the business (stationery for instance); and it has to be goods, services don’t count; then you will have to use a new 16.5% rate which effectively ends this little sideline. Fair enough of course, as it wasn’t designed to make anyone a profit but of course it does make things a whole lot more complicated for  any of you on the flat rate because it made life simpler. Because now it doesn’t. Every time you do a return you may... read more

Changing Perceptions

After last week’s post I was asked why I didn’t use a photo of Connery with Desmond Llewellyn (the original Q). Two reasons: firstly, I couldn’t find one and secondly the benefit in kind rules came in in the 70’s after Roger Moore took over so Connery’s Bond wouldn’t have had to worry about it. However during my research for a photo I came across an interesting fact. Apparently Fleming picked the name James Bond because he thought it sounded a very boring one (he had a copy of “Birds of the West Indies” by James Bond on his bookshelf and he certainly met the man himself). Ironic, because he made the name into one redolent with excitement, danger and glamour (and fast cars). It just shows how proper marketing can change peoples opinions of something. You could of course also ask why I didn’t pick Daniel Craig; again firstly, see above, and secondly the new Bond-mobiles have almost no gadgetry on board (which is truer to the novels; Fleming didn’t like gadgets, he wanted a grittier more realistic spy, having been in the SIS himself during the Second World War). Which brings me to my main point (apart from the marketing one, which is very important and I will be picking it up at a later date). Namely this; tax rules are constantly changing. What works this year may not work next year and sometimes you have to do a complete U-turn to get the most tax efficient results, all the while remembering not to let the tail wag the dog. Your aim in business is to make money, NOT to... read more

Easy to get hold of

“Paul of PGS Accountancy has been looking after my books for many years. He is easy to get hold of when I have a question and his answers are very informative plus more importantly he talks to me in a language that I understand. If you think all accountants are the same, you haven’t had a chat with Paul.”

Valerie Prentice: Cultural Bodyworks, Beverley

Reliable and Efficient service

Thank you for providing a high quality financial service to our Charity. Reliable and Efficient service always received. Thank you for making Accountancy understandable! Always willing to undertake the honorary treasurers role with enthusiasm!”

Debbie Andrew Manager of “Relate Hull & East Yorkshire”

He gives 100%

“Paul at PGS Accountancy is very friendly and approachable. Nothing is ever too much trouble. He gives 100% in his service and I would certainly recommend him to other businesses.”

Thank you

“Just a quick line to thank you for the work done for me in the past few years, the advice and assistance in sorting out my corporation tax in these very hard trading times is most welcome”

PGS Accountancy Services

54 Ridgestone Ave,
Bilton,
Hull.
HU11 4AJ

T: 01482 814895

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